Academics

Our academic program is designed to help students develop the skills they need to be successful in a complex world.  From outstanding advanced courses in all subjects, to outstanding arts programs, to experiential offerings, our curriculum is diverse, dynamic and able to meet the needs of a wide range of students.
Fryeburg Academy has a comprehensive and diverse curriculum designed to meet the needs of a wide range of learners.  To prepare students for limitless possibilities, the Academy offers more than 150 courses at various levels, including AP, honors, college prep, and technical prep.  In all of our classes, teachers employ diverse instruction methods and provide students with opportunities for individual assistance.  Our teachers strive to make material relevant, teach students to think critically, communicate effectively, and provide leadership opportunities.
 

Explore our Curriculum + Course Descriptions

English

The English curriculum at Fryeburg Academy provides a systematic accumulation of skills that promotes each student’s ability to construct meaning through reading, listening, and viewing. It also teaches how to present ideas and information through writing, speaking, and visual media. These skills developed through English language arts are essential for communicating the many dimensions of human experience, for working in other academic disciplines, and for engaging in the benefits and obligations of our culture and democracy. With a primary focus on reading and writing, the English curriculum fosters understanding and appreciation of the English language in all its capacities. Our goals are to enable students to make the experience and enjoyment of English a central part of their lives, as they construct and synthesize meaning from multiple sources, and to facilitate life-long learning. English I - IV are taken sequentially at each grade level. Students may not take two of these courses concurrently other than for the purpose of credit recovery following a course failure.
  • AP English Language & Composition

    Prerequisites: Recommendation from sophomore English teacher, successful completion of testing essay, and completion of summer reading. This course is intended for those students who already exhibit a strong command of standard English grammar and the five-paragraph essay. The aim of this course is to teach students to write effectively in their college courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives. Students will be engaged in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Emphasis is on expository, analytical and argumentative writing that emerges from reading across the curriculum, rather than solely from personal experiences and observations. Students in this course learn to read primary and secondary source material carefully, to synthesize material from these texts in their own compositions, and to cite source material using conventions recommended by Modern Language Association (MLA). Ultimately, the goal of this course is to increase an awareness of writing and reading as interactions among a writer’s purpose, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Students will be required to take the AP exam in May.
  • AP English Literature & Composition

    Prerequisites: Recommendation from junior English teacher, “B” or higher in Honors or AP prior to senior year, successful completion of summer reading requirement. The Advanced Placement course is the equivalent of a first-year college course in literature and composition. Students will read a variety of literature from several different genres and from a wide range of time periods. This course has a heavy reading load and requires a great deal of writing, much of it on-demand (timed). Students will learn to compose sophisticated literary analysis, specifically focused on how literary devices work together to illuminate the meaning of a work as a whole. Students in this course are required to take the AP examination in AP Literature and Composition (given in May) which determines whether a student may be eligible to receive college credit for the course.
  • English 176

    English 176 serves as a transition between ESOL III and English I, II or III.  This class is not an ESOL class.  It is a regular English class that focuses on reading literature, writing essays, and speaking publicly; but it is made up of only international students.  This class is an intermediary step for second language learners as they move from small classes that focus on language learning to larger classes that assume language fluency.
  • English I Honors

    Work at the honors level requires high productivity and presents greater challenges than work in Level I English classes. Students who sign up for this level should read at grade level or higher. At this level, the emphasis is on reading classic literature. Class discussion and effective communication skills are emphasized. Expectations also include a higher sophistication both in writing and in critical analysis of literature. Students are required to complete the designated summer reading as it segues into the first literary unit in September. Students should also expect to be tested on the assigned summer reading.
  • English I L1

    This course emphasizes cooperative learning and communication skills, including learning and practicing effective interpersonal and group communication skills. Students read at least three full-length novels each semester, including at least one Shakespeare play. They practice reading skills for a variety of situations and subjects; study vocabulary through word lists developed by the instructor and the students from their reading; and learn the elements of fiction and how to classify them in the texts they are reading. The writing curriculum consists of the basic organizations of descriptive, expository, narrative and persuasive essays. Students learn to research using a variety of sources and references and complete a substantial research project in the spring semester. Grammar is a large part of the curriculum, with a focus on the basic structure of sentences and how to identify parts of speech in a sentence.
  • English I L2

    This course is offered to freshmen who need to improve their fundamental English skills. The reading program includes contemporary writers, classics, and adolescent literature. The writing program includes instruction and guidance in the steps necessary for writing a research paper, expository writing, and personal essays, with an emphasis on the fundamentals of grammar. Students work to improve their organizational and study skills. Programs are adjusted to meet the abilities and needs of individual students.
  • English II Honors

    Skills addressed include strategies for analytical and interpretive reading, understanding the cultural backgrounds of the literature, and the nature and implications of the language used in the texts. Students will learn to glean appropriate information about the interpretations of the texts from analytical articles. Also, a major focus of the class will revolve around the process of writing and rhetorical applications, including research related support of thesis statements. Standard English conventions will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. Class discussion and various presentations will focus on the process and delivery of speaking to an audience.
  • English II L1

    This year-long course is intended for sophomores who have every intention of applying to college. As such, the reading program features a diverse collection of writers, cultures, and genres, with an emphasis on increasing the students’ understanding of figures of speech, imagery, inference, symbolism, satire, and irony. Through writing multiple short essays, students become proficient in analyzing and interpreting textual evidence from primary and secondary sources. Longer essays hone the development and support of thesis statements. Research skills are refined and practiced in at least one research paper that requires multiple sources. Creative writing may include, but is not limited to, journal reflections, poetry, short stories, and one-act plays. At least one Shakespeare play is required. Vocabulary and grammar skills are studied as essential to reading, writing, and oral communication. Each student is required to deliver an original speech by the end of the year.
  • English II L2

    This year-long course is designed for the student who requires extensive time and focus in reading comprehension and writing skills. The reading program features a diverse assortment of writers and genres, with an emphasis on increasing the student’s interest in and comprehension of various texts. Writing skills are addressed through multiple short essays to introduce the development and support of thesis statements, longer five-paragraph essays, creative writing, poetry, journal reflections and research. Vocabulary and grammar skills are studied as essential to reading, writing, speaking, and professional communication. Each student is required to deliver an original speech by the end of the year.
  • English III Honors

    This course is intended to be a demanding survey of American literature, emphasizing the American classics of poetry and prose. A variety of critical formats will be introduced, and students will be required to write frequent critical essays using those approaches to the literature. This class should be seen as preparation for AP Literature and Composition and will therefore develop the skills necessary for that course or for college English.
  • English III L1

    English III focuses on American literature, although at least one Shakespeare play is required reading. Relationships between literature and culture are studied by considering the original context of writings, informed by the students’ knowledge of American history. Topics of discussion will include the American dream and how it has changed over time. What has it meant to be an American in the past, and what does it mean now? Vocabulary exercises designed for SAT preparation are included in the curriculum. Speaking skills are integral to classroom work every day and are crucial to formal presentations and public speaking events. This is a rigorous, writing-intensive class requiring students to complete many essays and a research project by the end of the year.
  • English III L2

    This course is designed for the student who requires more time and focus in reading comprehension and writing skills. It will include the study of major American writers, a research paper and extensive review of English conventions. The program addresses the process of writing using analytical reasoning. Assessment is based mainly on four to six thesis-based essays written during the semester, reading comprehension quizzes, creative projects and skills development.
  • English IV Honors

    English IV Honors is a challenging adventure into the global and personal landscape of the written word through memoir, fiction, rhetorical analysis, journal writing, formal writing, and ending the year with a personal portfolio. The first semester is devoted to studying the language, author’s tone, purpose, as well as the themes of Holocaust memoirs and dystopian literature. Students examine the social, political, and cultural times in which the author is writing, and students will be expected to engage in intellectual discussion and written analysis of the author’s tone and purpose. The second semester is devoted to students finding their own voices in their writing through the writer’s workshop which includes rhetorical analysis, poetry, fiction, narrative, essay, book project, ending the semester with individual portfolio performances of their work.
  • English IV L1

    This survey course offers a focus in reading and writing intended to prepare students for college-level work. Units may include (though are not limited to) British Literature, Gothic Literature, Graphic Novel and Literature of the Insane. Through close reading of a wide variety of literature, students will hone their analytical and critical thinking skills. In addition, students will learn to write clearly and effectively. Emphasis will be on the writing process through drafting, revising, editing and peer review.
  • English IV L2

    This survey course offers a focus in reading and writing skills. Units may include (though are not limited to) Fantasy, Dystopia, Graphic Novel and self-selected fiction. Through a combination of independent and guided reading, students will hone their analytical and critical thinking skills. In addition, students will learn to write clearly and effectively. Emphasis will be on the writing process through drafting, revising, editing and peer review.
  • ESOL I

    ESOL English classes focus on the development of academic language skills and proficiency. Students are grouped together by communicative ability and skill level.  All ESOL English classes integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening and grammar directed at preparing students to succeed in FA mainstream courses as well as post-secondary studies. 
  • ESOL III

    ESOL English classes focus on the development of academic language skills and proficiency. Students are grouped together by communicative ability and skill level.  All ESOL English classes integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening and grammar directed at preparing students to succeed in FA mainstream courses as well as post-secondary studies. 

Course Requirements

View our complete academic policies and procedures in our Curriculum Handbook, and learn more about course requirements below:

List of 1 items.

  • Graduation Requirements

    To qualify for a Fryeburg Academy diploma, students must complete four years of study with a minimum of 21 credits, see below:

    One Carnegie Credit is defined as two semesters of work. 
    Courses  Carnegie Credits
    English 4
    Math 3
    Science 3
    Social Studies 2 (not including US History)
    U.S. History 1
    Fine Arts /Tech Arts 1
    Wellness 2 (including 0.5 Health)
    Electives 5
    Total Needed 21

Fryeburg Academy

FRYEBURG ACADEMY
745 Main Street
Fryeburg, ME 04037
p. (207) 935-2001      
f.  (207) 935-5013      
admissions@fryeburgacademy.org
Fryeburg Academy is an independent boarding and day school, serving grades 9-12 and postgraduate. We invite you to explore our site and learn how students from around the globe find their place in the world through our exceptional academic, art, and athletic programs.