Academics

Our academic program is designed to help students develop the skills they need to be successful in a complex world.  From outstanding advanced courses in all subjects, to outstanding arts programs, to experiential offerings, our curriculum is diverse, dynamic and able to meet the needs of a wide range of students.
Academics
World Classroom@FA

World Classroom@FA Courses

With these uncertain times, our World Classroom @Fryeburg Academy remote learning option will offer students an Academy experience from the comfort of their homes. Choose from one or up to five online courses to get started. These online classes are in realtime where students and teachers from around the world build traditional classroom relationships. Want to join us in later in-person? No problem! Our online program easily switches to in-person learning based on your family's needs. Why wait? Check out some of our most popular courses below:

English

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  • Eng I: Welcome to FA English

    This course emphasizes cooperative learning and communication skills, including learning and practicing effective interpersonal and group communication skills. Students read at least three full-length novels each semester, including at least one Shakespeare play. They practice reading skills for a variety of situations and subjects; study vocabulary through word lists developed by the instructor and the students from their reading; and learn the elements of fiction and how to classify them in the texts they are reading. The writing curriculum consists of the basic organizations of descriptive, expository, narrative, and persuasive essays. Students learn to research using a variety of sources and references and complete a substantial research project in the spring semester. Grammar is a large part of the curriculum, with a focus on the basic structure of sentences and how to identify parts of speech in a sentence.
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  • Eng II: World Literature

    This year-long course is designed for the student who requires extensive time and focus in reading comprehension and writing skills. The reading program features a diverse assortment of writers and genres, with an emphasis on increasing the student’s interest in and comprehension of various texts. 
    Writing skills are addressed through multiple short essays to introduce the development and support of thesis statements, longer five-paragraph essays, creative writing, poetry, journal reflections and research. Vocabulary and grammar skills are studied as essential to reading, writing, speaking, and professional communication.  Each student is required to deliver an original speech by the end of the year.
     
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  • Eng III: The American Experience

    English III focuses on American literature, although at least one Shakespeare play is required reading.  Relationships between literature and culture are studied by considering the original context of writings, informed by the students’ knowledge of American history.  Topics of discussion will include the American dream and how it has changed over time.  What has it meant to be an American in the past, and what does it mean now?  Vocabulary exercises designed for SAT preparation are included in the curriculum.  Speaking skills are integral to classroom work every day and are crucial to formal presentations and public speaking events.  This is a rigorous, writing-intensive class requiring students to complete many essays and a research project by the end of the year.
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  • Eng IV: College Writing

    The course prepares students for college-level writing and reading.  In the first semester, students practice writing the types of essays they will be required to compose in college, such as descriptive, comparison/contrast, critical analysis, and argumentation. To begin the year, students compose three essays for their college applications. In addition, the students learn how to critique their peers’ essays; thus, they are expected to analyze and verbally review each other’s work. In the second semester, students learn strategies for efficient non-fiction reading, and develop skills for analyzing and evaluating both fiction and non-fiction. 
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ESOL English

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  • Advanced ESOL

    ESOL Advanced English classes focus on the development of academic language skills and proficiency. Students are grouped together by communicative ability and skill level.  All ESOL English classes integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening and grammar directed at preparing students to succeed in FA mainstream courses as well as post-secondary studies. 
  • Beginning ESOL

    ESOL Beginning English classes focus on the development of academic language skills and proficiency. Students are grouped together by communicative ability and skill level.  All ESOL English classes integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening, and grammar directed at preparing students to succeed in FA mainstream courses as well as post-secondary studies. 
  • Intermediate ESOL

    ESOL Intermediate English classes focus on the development of academic language skills and proficiency. Students are grouped together by communicative ability and skill level.  All ESOL English classes integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening, and grammar directed at preparing students to succeed in FA mainstream courses as well as post-secondary studies. 
  • Transitional ESOL

    ESOL Transitional English classes focus on the development of academic language skills and proficiency. Students are grouped together by communicative ability and skill level.  All ESOL English classes integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening, and grammar directed at preparing students to succeed in FA mainstream courses as well as post-secondary studies. 

Math

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  • Algebra II

    Prerequisite: Geometry Level 1
    The Algebra II course is designed to apply the fundamental skills of algebra to such topics as functions, equations and inequalities, probability and statistics, exponential relationships, quadratic and polynomial equations, and matrices. Students will understand and apply operations with complex numbers, exponents and radicals. Additionally, students will use their algebraic skills to solve systems of equations and inequalities and interpret the solutions. This course introduces students to the composition of functions and inverse functions as well as inverse variation.  Scientific calculator required.
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  • AP Calculus AB

    Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Honors with a grade of A or B 
    The course covers the theory and application of the derivative and its interpretation as an instantaneous rate of change using numerical, graphical and analytical approaches.  The theory of the definite integral and anti-derivatives is developed with strong focus on applications in geometry, physics and economics.  The course follows the College Board curriculum in order to adequately prepare students to take the AP examination, which is required for the completion of the course.  Texas Instruments (TI-83/84) calculator required. 
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  • AP Calculus BC

    Prerequisite: AB Calculus
    This course begins with advanced integral techniques and covers applications of the integral, sequences, series, Taylor series and vectors.  In the second semester students begin multi-variable calculus.  Students will be required to take the AP Calculus BC examination.  Texas Instruments (TI-83/84) calculator required. 
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  • AP Statistics

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus or grade of A/B in Algebra II Honors
    The purpose of AP Statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  Emphasis will be placed on mathematical reasoning and communication.  Probability and statistical concepts along with calculation will be covered.  Students will be required to take the AP examination.  Texas Instruments (TI-83/84) calculator required. 
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  • Finite Math

    Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry
    Various math topics are covered, including: patterns; set and set theory; logic; linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions; multiple systems of equations; probability and statistical analysis; and other topics introduced at the discretion of the teacher. SAT review is woven into the course at appropriate times of the year. College credit is possible provided students earn a successful CLEP score at the end of course. Scientific calculator required.
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  • Honors Algebra II

    Prerequisite: High School Geometry Honors
    The Honors Algebra II course covers the standard Algebra II material in greater depth with some additional topics involving higher levels of abstraction. Successful completion of Algebra II Honors will prepare students to take Pre-Calculus Honors. Scientific calculator required.
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  • Honors PreCalculus

    Prerequisite:Geometry Honors and Algebra II Honors with a grade of A or B.
    This course is available to students with a strong interest and proven ability in math and science. Students will explore quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, periodic, rational and polynomial functions graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally. Functions will be investigated as models of change and most of the examples and problems are given in the context of real-world problems. This course stresses a conceptual understanding of mathematical ideas and is designed to prepare students to learn calculus and other college-level mathematics. Students are required to complete a summer assignment prior to the start of the school year. Texas Instruments (TI-83/84) calculator required. 
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Science

List of 7 items.

  • AP Chemistry

    Prerequisite:a B or better in Honors Chemistry and a teacher’s recommendation.
    CorequisitePre-calculus (recommended but not required) 
    Advanced Placement Chemistry is a course that follows the College Board’s curriculum and is the equivalent of a first-year college level inorganic chemistry course. Topics of study build on principles learned in the general chemistry course with an emphasis on mathematical formulation and the integration of modern atomic and molecular theories, stoichiometry, kinetic molecular and collision theories, thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Concepts from each unit are applied in challenging laboratory experiments that incorporate techniques such as spectrophotometry, titration, gravimetric analysis, and graphical analysis. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Chemistry exam in May. Calculators from Texas Instruments TI 36X Pro to TI 89 are appropriate.
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  • AP Physics: Mechanics

    PrerequisitesPre-calculus; completion of Honors Physics with grade of B or higher, or permission from the instructor. 
    Corequisite: Calculus.
    This course is an intensive study of mechanics and prepares students to take the AP Physics C exam in.  Students in AP Physics will study many of the same topics as Honors Physics, but in greater depth and more rigorous analysis techniques, including calculus.  Emphasis will be placed on applying concepts to problem-solving, developing laboratory techniques, analyzing data, and computational techniques.  Labs will be more open-ended, with students responsible for developing most of the experimental procedure.  Students will compile a portfolio of lab reports to demonstrate understanding of experimental processes.  Topics include mechanics, including motion in one, two, and three dimensions, graphical analysis, Newton’s Laws, planetary motion, energy, momentum, rotational motion, and simple harmonic motion.  Students enrolled in this course will be expected to take the AP Physics C exam in May. Texas Instrument T1-84 calculator (any model) required.
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  • Biology

    CorequisiteAlgebra 1A, 1B, or Level 1 Algebra
    Biology introduces students to the diversity and complexity of living things. Topics of study include classification, ecology, cells, biochemistry, genetics, evolution, bacteria, viruses, zoology, botany, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, protists, microscope use, and the use of the scientific method. Our approach includes group and individual classwork, homework, lectures, tests, laboratory experiments, projects, and outdoor activities.  Students will apply inquiry and problem-solving approaches in-class activities. They will learn to formulate, analyze, and justify ideas to make informed decisions about scientific situations and issues. They will practice skills in communicating scientific ideas through the use of appropriate symbols and terminology in a variety of forms. Students will understand the historical, social, economic, environmental, and ethical implications of science and technology in the 21st century. Basic calculator required.
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  • Chemistry

    Prerequisite: Algebra 1B or Level 1 Algebra
    Chemistry is a college preparatory course in which students are given an introduction to the structure of matter and the changes it undergoes through chemical reactions.  Problem-solving methods are emphasized throughout the course through laboratory work, data analysis, and applications to real-life problems.  Topics of study include unit analysis, measurements, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, nomenclature, stoichiometry, acid-base chemistry, energy, light properties, gas behavior, as well as applications to biochemistry, energy, and the environment. Scientific calculator required.
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  • Honors Biology

    CorequisiteGeometry or Algebra I Honors
    Biology Honors is a laboratory-oriented course that introduces students to the diversity among and connections between all living things past and present. Topics of study include: adaptation, evolution, biodiversity, classification, identification, biochemistry, cell structure, photosynthesis, cellular processes, and genetics. Students practice and develop laboratory skills through research, experimental design, use of technology, writing of lab reports, and application of the scientific method. Students in Biology Honors are expected to be able to memorize extensive material, take detailed notes, read and understand a textbook, participate thoughtfully in classroom discussions, and write well-organized essays. In laboratory work, students are expected to follow detailed instructions and work independently.  Students will apply inquiry and problem-solving approaches in class activities and laboratory work. They will learn to formulate and justify ideas to make informed decisions about scientific situations and issues. They will practice skills in communicating scientific ideas through use of appropriate symbols and terminology in a variety of forms. Students will understand the historical, social, economic, environmental, and ethical implications of science and technology in the 21st century.  Basic calculator required.
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  • Honors Chemistry

    Prerequisite:Honors Algebra 1 and evidence of a strong foundation in mathematical problem-solving. Calculators from Texas Instruments TI 36X Pro to TI 89 are appropriate.
    This course covers the same topics as Chemistry but moves at a highly accelerated pace and explores topics in greater depth. Honors chemistry also challenges students to engage in independent inquiry-based topics. 
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  • Honors Physics

    Prerequisite: Geometry; a B or better in Honors Chemistry, or an A in regular Chemistry with a teacher’s recommendation.
    CorequisitePre-calculus
    Physics strives to describe the universe in the language of mathematics, and this course can be seen as a bridge between the student’s math courses and the real world.  Physics at Fryeburg Academy is an algebra-based introduction to many topics in physics, and efforts are made to relate topics studied in class to students’ experience.  Students should have a strong foundation in mathematics and should be very comfortable with solving equations, isolating variables, and applying logic to solving problems, as well as basic laboratory and measurement practices.  A number of lab experiments, hands-on activities and group challenges are used to reinforce material encountered in problems and allow students to apply their knowledge.  Honors physics is recommended for students with excellent math skills who plan to pursue a field of study in physical sciences or engineering.   Topics to be covered include mechanics, vectors and scalars, Newton’s Laws of Motion, circular motion, energy and its conservation, linear momentum and its conservation, waves and sound, optics and electromagnetic radiation, and electric circuits. Texas Instrument T1-84 calculator (any model) required.
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Social Studies

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  • American Studies

    This course explores the development of America’s multicultural society. Using all of the social sciences, students will look at primary sources to study the processes that helped a nation come to terms with the many cultures that come to define it. Special attention will be paid to the emergence of the United States onto the global stage and how that contributes to the make-up of the world we live in today.  This is a junior class.
  • AP US History

    Prerequisites: Recommendation of previous instructor and satisfactory completion of summer work.
    Advanced Placement United States History is designed for students who display a serious interest and aptitude for U.S. History.  The focus of the course is to enhance the basic curriculum with supplementary readings including primary sources and in-depth scholarly writings.  Students taking the class will be required to take the Advanced Placement Exam to qualify for college credit. Students are required to take the AP exam in May
  • Ethics

    Designed to give students a forum in which to explore the complexities of ethical concerns confronting society today.  Through readings, discussions, written assignments, and the use of both historical and current case studies, students will be asked to deal with issues such as what differentiates ethical from unethical behavior; are there universal values which establish the guidelines for ethical behavior; and how do these issues apply to their own lives.
  • Global Issues

    This course places contemporary global issues in a historical context. Themes include social justice and human rights; international power structures; geopolitics, including the specter of terrorism; economic interdependence; climate change and global health. The course explores the fluid meanings of race, gender, and social hierarchy through cross-cultural comparisons. Students will examine the ways that global markets, social media, and human migrations have interconnected and linked peoples that were only recently kept relatively separate by great distances. Students will approach topics in an interdisciplinary manner, drawing from anthropology, sociology, history, economic and cultural studies. Over the course of the year, students will hone their writing, communication, and analytical skills through project-based learning and research essays.  
  • Sociology

    Sociology is designed to explore human behavior in a social context.  Students will learn about relationships within groups such as family and peers and will explore human relationships within society at large.  The course will focus on the current social issues and problems facing America today.  Specific topics of study include issues of race, gender, equality, poverty and crime.  Students will be required to research these and other topics as well as participate in a number of structured debates. 

ESOL Social Studies

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  • Foundations in U.S. History (ESOL)

    Foundations in History is an introduction to the United States for beginning and intermediate English speakers.  It aims to help students who are new to this country get to know the basics of American geography, history, government, ethnic and religious groups, holidays, notable people, and more.  All Fryeburg Academy students must earn a U.S. History credit in order to graduate.  This class will prepare them for future success in a U.S. History class.
  • Global Studies (ESOL)

    This course is designed to help students develop greater fluency in English through the study of recent history and
    current global issues.  International students discuss, read, analyze, and write about world issues.  The course also stresses the skills and concepts necessary for success in social studies courses.  The main content focus is on the United Nations, its origins, organization, aims, and issues.  The teacher provides material for students to engage through writing, presentations, projects, debates, and portfolios.  Students will be challenged to think critically and creatively as problem solvers and change-makers in their future lives. 
  • World History (ESOL)

    Acquiring fundamental knowledge of American social and political history as well as good English skills are the basis of this course.  Students study the origin and growth of American social, cultural, and political traditions from the colonial era to the Twentieth Century.  Interpretive social studies skills, listening, note-taking, research (both print and web-based), discussions, and writing are all important components of the course. 

Electives

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  • Elective Options

    World Classroom @Fryeburg Academy students have the option to take a multitude of electives that range from courses such as Film I, Music, Computer Technology, Music Technology, and many more.

Fryeburg Academy

FRYEBURG ACADEMY
745 Main Street
Fryeburg, ME 04037
p. (207) 935-2001      
f.  (207) 935-5013      
admissions@fryeburgacademy.org
Fryeburg Academy is an independent boarding and day school, serving grades 9-12 and postgraduate. We invite you to explore our site and learn how students from around the globe find their place in the world through our exceptional academic, art, and athletic programs.